Time to take action for Brazil’s forests

We need your help now

Brazil’s parliament has just passed legislation that will strip the Amazon and other important regions of critical environmental protections. The future of Brazil’s forests now lies in the hands of President Dilma Rousseff who has just days to veto changes to the country’s long-standing Forest Code. We need your help right now to stop the law being approved in the next few weeks. Please encourage President Dilma to stand by her election promises and veto any law that legitimizes deforestation.

What you can do right now

Use one of our suggested posts or write your own message to show how you feel. Just make sure to tag the PartidodosTrabalhadores Facebook page or tweet @ptbrasil using #SOSBrazil

Facebook

Dear President Dilma Rousseff and your party PartidodosTrabalhadores, please save the rainforest and protect our climate. Veto the new Forest Code! http://bit.ly/sosbrazil

Dear President Dilma Rousseff and your party PartidodosTrabalhadores, your credibility is like the forest: once it’s gone it’s gone! Stand by your election promises and veto the new Forest Code! http://bit.ly/sosbrazil

Dear President Dilma Rousseff and your party PartidodosTrabalhadores, don’t undo years of success in tackling Brazilian deforestation. Veto the new Forest Code! http://bit.ly/sosbrazil

Twitter

President Dilma of @ptbrasil, please save the rainforest & our climate. Veto the new Forest Code! #SOSBrazil http://bit.ly/sosbrazil Pls RT

President Dilma of @ptbrasil, please veto changes to the Forest Code. Create a sustainable future! #SOSBrazil http://bit.ly/sosbrazil Pls RT

President Dilma of @ptbrasil, don’t undo decades of work to protect forests. Veto the new Forest Code! #SOSBrazil http://bit.ly/sosbrazil Pls RT

 

What’s this all about?

Brazil’s Forest Code is one of the most impressive laws on forest protection in the world. And it’s central to Brazil’s recent success in reducing deforestation in places like the Amazon. But for years, it’s been under pressure from agribusiness interests who see the restrictions on deforestation as a barrier to agricultural development.

After heavy lobbying by agribusiness – and going against public opinion, scientific evidence and legal advice – Brazil’s Parliament has finally succeeded in passing controversial changes to the Forest Code. If they go ahead, it could affect up to 76 million hectares of forest – that’s an area the size of Germany, Italy and Austria combined.

Destroying or not restoring this much forest would release the equivalent of 28 billion tonnes of CO2*. That’s around four times the target for global greenhouse gas emissions cuts laid out by the Kyoto Protocol for 2008-12.

Polls show that as many as 80% of Brazilian people oppose the changes to the Forest Code. Thousands have taken to the streets in protest, and millions of people around the globe have supported them by e-mailing President Rousseff or sharing the story on Facebook and Twitter. Together, we managed to delay this vote three times.

Now we need your help to make sure the changes never come into force.

 Why Brazil must protect the Forest Code

Brazil has built a well-earned reputation for tackling deforestation and protecting the environment. With the country about to host this summer’s UN Conference on Sustainable Development (aka Rio+20), the Brazilian government risks enormous damage to its international status on biodiversity and climate protection.

Brazil has committed itself to reducing deforestation by 80% in the Amazon and by 40% in Cerrado (tropical savannah) and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by up to 39% by 2020. Those commitments will be impossible to meet if the proposed bill becomes law.

The changes to the Forest Code would have severe environmental, social and economic consequences – from huge increases in deforestation, risks of flooding and loss of sensitive ecosystems and habitats to billions of tonnes of additional greenhouse gas emissions, undermining efforts to keep global warming below 2°C.

* Figures from a 2011 study by Brazil’s government-led research organisation IPEA (Institute of Applied Economic Research)

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  • Soknightley

    ….